How to Prevent Chrome from Saving Your Credit Card Info

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It may only save you a few seconds, but you may opt to use an auto-fill feature. But while it may be great to sign in faster, when dealing with information such as your financial data, speed may not matter so much.

There are options such as LastPass that can save your sensitive information, but should you keep such details on your Chrome browser? If you’re uncomfortable with Chrome saving your credit card information, there is a way to prevent that from happening.

How to Prevent Chrome from Saving Your Financial Data – Desktop

If your answer is “thanks, but no thanks” when it comes to saving your sensitive financial data on Chrome, there is something you can do about it. By clicking on the three dots at the top-right and clicking on Settings, you should see the “Autofill” section. The second option down will be the Payment methods option.

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Click on the arrow pointing right, and any payment methods you set up will appear here. There is also an option to add any future payment methods, but in the section below you’ll see if that’s a good idea or not.

To prevent Chrome from saving any credit card information, toggle off the option, and you’re good to go. If you want to remove a payment method that you previously added, click on the three dots to the right of the expiration date.

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When you click on the dots, the remove option will appear. Click on it, and your payment method will disappear.

How to Stop Chrome from Saving Your Credit Card Info – Android

Preventing Chrome from saving your credit card is also an easy task on your Android device. Open Chrome, tap on the three dots and go to Settings, followed by Payment methods.

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Any previous payment methods you added will show up here. If you only want to disable the feature and not remove any credit card information, toggle the feature off. To remove any financial info, select the dots of the one you want to delete.

How to Turn Off the Payment Method Option in Chrome – iOS

If you’re on your iPad or iPhone, you can disable Payment Methods by tapping on the three dots at the top-right and toggling off the feature. It’s that easy.

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If you want to disable autofill or remove any credit cards you previously added, you’ll need to go into your device’s Settings.  Once you’re in Settings, swipe down until you find Safari.

Under the General section, tap on Autofill and disable the Credit Card option. As long as you’re there, you can also prevent the autofill feature from adding your contact info. To check if you have any credit cards saved, tap on the “Saved Credit Cards” option. You’ll need to use Touch ID or your passcode to enter.

Pay Cards

Once you’re in, you should see any credit cards you added before. If you want to remove any, tap on one and select the edit option, then just tap on the red Delete option.

Should You Keep Financial Data on Your Browser?

Is it safe to keep such sensitive information as your financial information on your browser just to make it easier to fill out forms? Keep in mind that you could come across phishing sites that can use malicious code to trick the browser’s autofill into giving confidential information you did not approve.

The good thing that this does not have to be the case with Chrome. But what if someone were to gain access to your browser? What if you sell or give your device away and forget to clean your data thoroughly? As mentioned before, using a password manager (that also has options to save financial data) will give you a higher level of security when it comes to saving such sensitive information.

Conclusion

If you want to keep your financial data safe somewhere, it’s best that you use trustworthy apps such as LastPass. These types of apps offer more security when it comes to this kind of data. Will you still keep your credit card data on your browser?

2 comments

  1. The overarching question is “WHY is Chrome saving users’ financial information?!” Firefox (and browsers based on FF) do not have such an option. Is it to save users couple of key strokes or is it to make it easier for Google to gather users’ financial data?

    “when dealing with information such as your financial data, speed may not matter so much”
    As we all know, Speed Kills. :-)

  2. No, nothing personal should be saved in a browser; there are far too many doors into and out of them. It’s one thing to save financial info on a site but in a browser the info is there to be hacked anywhere you go.

    Chrome saves stuff you delete, best to find all the caches it uses and periodically delete their contents. I don’t save credit card data in chrome, it’s set up not to, but transactions are saved, buried in caches. Chrome saves your browsing sessions after you close it; even if you set it to clear cache, etc. They are cleared a few moments after the next browser start. Can’t comment on how MS’s new chromedgium browser will treat your data but it’s pretty likely all that data that’s sent out oat browser start will go to even more places.

    Nirsoft has a little utility to view your chrome cache, called “chromecacheview” the one you thought was deleted; this is just the big one, there are multiple smaller caches. Eye opening if you’ve never seen how private chrome isn’t.

    None of the above behavior can be changed in any chromium version, google only allows certain features to be altered.

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