iOS or Android – Which Camp Are You in and Why?

It’s a question that isn’t asked much anymore, as we all seem set in our ways, and we certainly won’t settle it here, but we thought it would be interesting to take a look at your preferred mobile OS. Everyone has their preferences, and we want to know why. We asked our writers, “iOS or Android – which camp are you in and why?”

Ada goes with Android mostly because she’s just a fan of open source. She’s not a big mobile user, though, and mainly uses her smartphone as a clock with an older version of Android. The only time she actively uses mobile is when she’s traveling, which isn’t often.

For Phil, it’s “iOS all the way.” He fully admits to having been an Apple nerd for some time but also admits he’s “had to be platform agnostic to get the job done.” He likes the way iOS works consistently across different models and finds “the inconsistencies between Android devices more than a little frustrating at times.” He doesn’t think they’re as durable but also admits to never owning “a decent quality Android phone.”

Kenneth is an Android fan for many reasons but says “customization and storage are the main reasons why I feel disinclined to switch to Apple.” He likes that Android is “highly customizable as opposed to the homogeneity offered by Apple.” He captures a lot of photos and videos, so he needs a lot of storage, and Android offers support for microSD, which Apples doesn’t.

writers-opinion-ios-android-content

Alex is currently using an iOS device, “but it’s mostly because I like it more, not because it’s inherently better.” When he made the switch, he thought he’d miss Android’s customizability but has learned “I’m pretty bad at customizing my devices and still having them function reasonably well.” He adds that he’s substituted the opinion on Apple’s designers for his own, and he’s not unhappy about that.

Fabio uses Android because he feels he has more options than iOS and believes you can do more with Android as well.

Ryan is another one who likes the customization of Android, with custom launchers and ROMs. He doesn’t like the closed ecosystem of iOS. “While I will admit that iOS is superior for people who want an easier, more fluid ‘it just works’ experience, anyone who wants more control over their device has to go with Android.”

With two Android phones, an Android tablet, and an Android TV box, Damien feels he’s “too heavily invested in the Android ecosystem” to make the switch to iOS. Additionally, he notes he’s “cheap and doesn’t want to spend a laptop price on an iPhone.” He does own an old one, though, but it’s used strictly for development and testing.

Everyone who knows me knows I’m a die hard iOS gal. I don’t even use a computer as much, but if I did it would be a Mac, as like Phil, I’ve been an Apple nerd as well for years. But I do everything on my trusty iPad. I happen to like it better. I’ve used the Androids of others, but it just doesn’t compare to the experience of using an iPhone to me.

What about you? If you’re using Android, is it because of the customization options? If you prefer iOS, is it because you’re a longtime Apple user or because you don’t to customize your phone in the first place? iOS or Android – which camp are you in and why? Join our conversation in the comments section below.

3 comments

  1. I use both Android (because my office gives us that) and an iPhone (personal).

    I use Android because I have to. It is the only non-Apple piece of technology I use. Why? It is unintuitive, bad UI (almost an after thought) and simply put too many small things that should be fixed. There seems to be no value assigned to ease of use.

    Having said that I think people should buy what they enjoy instead of worrying about what is good and bad. The basic functions work on both the platforms.

  2. Android is a non-starter on mobile because the platform security is terrible. I simply cannot risk personal information with the vulnerabilities Google introduced into its version of Linux, which have already given rise to numerous pieces of malware, even in the Google Play store. There are even Android botnets.

  3. Android, but only after rooting to purge the google infection. Trust not the company big data – Master Yoda

Comments are closed.

Sponsored Stories