How to Install Zoom on Linux

How To Install Zoom On Linux Feature Image

“Can I install Zoom on Linux?” was the first question that came to mind when my bosses informed me that we would be working from home and using Zoom for remote meetings and one-on-one interactions with fellow employees and clients. The answer to that first question is yes, you can install Zoom on Linux. Let’s look at how to download and install the Zoom client on four different Linux distributions: Fedora, Manjaro (Arch), OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu/Debian.

How to Install Zoom in Fedora

To show how to install Zoom in Fedora, we are using Fedora 35. To get started,, you have to first download the package from the Zoom website.

  1. Open your web browser and go to the Zoom download page.
Zoom Fedora Download
  1. Choose “Fedora” for “Linux Type” and “64-bit” for “OS Architecture.” Click “Download.”
  2. Save the file to your Downloads folder.
Zoom Fedora Install Save File
  1. Open a terminal window and type the following command:
Zoom Fedora Command Line Install
  1. Enter the root password when prompted, then “y” when prompted. This will install the Zoom package.
  2. Launch Zoom from the Applications menu.
Zoom Fedora Application Launch

Alternatively, if you want to avoid using the terminal and command lines, right-click the downloaded package (x86_64.rpm) and select “Open with Software Install.”

Zoom Fedora Open With Software Manager

Enter the root password when prompted.

Zoom Opensuse Zoom Installation Discover Authentication

Wait for Zoom to be installed.

Zoom Fedora Install Open

How to Install Zoom in OpenSUSE

A fork of openSUSE Linux Enterprise, openSUSE Leap, is one of the most stable and popular Linux distros in the open source community. We are using openSUSE Leap for this tutorial.

  1. Open your web browser and go to the Zoom download page.
  2. Choose “OpenSUSE” for “Linux Type” and “64-bit” for “OS Architecture.” Click “Download.”
Zoom Opensuse Download Zoom Save As
  1. Save the file to your Downloads folder.
  2. Once downloaded, open a terminal window and type the following command:
Zoom Opensuse Zoom Installation Command 1
  1. Enter the root password when prompted, then click “y” when prompted. This will install Zoom on your system.
  2. Click “i” (for ignore) when presented the “Signature verification failed [6-File is unsigned]” message.
Zoom Opensuse Zoom Command Line Install
  1. Once installed, you can launch Zoom from the Applications menu.

Alternatively, you can right-click the “zoom_openSUSE_x86_64.rpm” package and select “Open with Discover.”

Zoom Opensuse Zoom Installation Discover 1

This will allow you to install Zoom with a GUI interface.

How to Install Zoom in Manjaro

Manjaro is based on Arch Linux and is a distro that is easy to use, particularly for new Linux users.

Note that installing the Zoom client on an Arch-based distro differs greatly from installing on a Debian-based or RHEL-based distro. With an Arch-based distro, you need to run the makefile command to install the Zoom client.

  1. Open a terminal to install the git and base-devel tools.
Zoom Manjaro Command Line Install
  1. Get the Zoom package via the git clone.
  1. Change to the “zoom” directory and install Zoom via the makepkg command.

Enter “y” when prompted to proceed with the installation.

Zoom Manjaro Makepkg 1
  1. Once installed, you can launch Zoom from the Applications menu.

How to Install Zoom in Ubuntu/Debian

  1. Open your web browser and go to the Zoom download page.
  2. Choose “Ubuntu” (or Debian) for “Linux Type,” “64-bit” for “OS Architecture,” and click “Download.”. Save the .deb file to your Downloads folder.
Zoom Popos Save As
  1. Open a terminal window. Change directory to the “Downloads” directory and launch the Zoom installation via the apt install command.

Enter the root password when prompted. Also, click “y” when prompted.

  1. Once installed, you can launch Zoom from the Applications menu.

Alternatively, you can double-click the .deb file to launch the Software Center Installer. Click the Install button.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Why should I install Zoom on Linux when there are so many Zoom plugins?

Although the Zoom plugin is available for multiple web browsers, in the rare event your web browser stops working, you have the Zoom client. Besides, sometimes it takes months after a new release for the developers to update plugins.

2. Can you easily uninstall the Zoom client?

Uninstalling Zoom is a snap from the command line. All distros can be uninstalled via a single command.

For example, to uninstall the Zoom client from an Ubuntu-based distro, enter the following from the command line:

Alternatively, to uninstall from a Red-Hat based distro, enter the following from the command line:

The Arch distro install is just as easy:

Uninstalling Zoom from other Linux distros is just as simple.

3. Why not just install Zoom from the distro’s repository?

Linux development teams have been slow to adopt Zoom in their repositories. They’re coming around, though. For example, Fedora includes Zoom in its repository.

It’s refreshing to see Linux installation options for such a popular application like Zoom – especially when so many application development teams overlook Linux when they release a new version of an application. Not only do the Zoom developers offer a Linux installation, they go the extra mile by offering multiple installs for different Linux distros, including Ubuntu, Debian, and Arch.

If you’re looking for some extra help with Zoom, check out this Zoom keyboard shortucuts cheatsheet and how to use a custom background with Zoom.

Michael Travis Rose Michael Travis Rose

I'm a United States Navy veteran who has worked in IT for over twenty years. I've also written a plethora of technical articles, NFL articles, history articles, and other articles on a potpourri of topics for various websites over the past ten years.

4 comments

  1. Actually, these instructions all fail when the architecture is not X86_64 compatible. ARM or AARCH64, for example, is not supported in that source.

    1. Not a surprise, X86_64 is the dominant architecture today. They have enough to code to the way it is, 9 different Linux OS’s including mostly .deb and .rpm but also arch and “other” (gcc). I am thinking if there are not enough users they just don’t find it worth their time and effort.

    2. Hi, William,

      Thanks for pointing this out. I should have noted that at the beginning of the article. I’ll talk to the editors to see if we can’t get that put in.

      Have a great Thanksgiving,

      Travis

  2. I have been using Zoom for over two years using POP!_OS (based on Ubuntu). I use it in my teaching of courses in our Annual Short School for Wastewater Operators, which is sponsored by the Va. DEQ and the Continuing Ed Dept of Va. Tech. It has worked great for me for the past two years.

    A suggestion for presenters: Enlarge your cursor (pointer) so that it is easily seen in your presentations (I use Impress others use Power Point). Otherwise your pointer on your presentation will be a very small dot and very hard to see.

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