How Much of Your Work Can You Do Offline?

I’m old enough to remember when computers first became mainstream. There was a time when no one had them on their work desks, and no one had one sitting in their den in their home. As a computer typesetter for a printing company, I was the only person in the entire business who had a computer on her desk.

But now many of us have computers on our desks, as well as desktops in our homes and/or laptops. And that’s not even including all the mobile devices we’re using. We do so much online these days. This inspired us to ask, “How much of your work can you do offline?”

Damien reports that if he’s working, “then almost everything requires Internet access.” He also admits to feeling “crippled” without that Internet connection. In his leisure time he likes gaming, and he can get by at that point without the Internet, but even then, some games still require a connection to the Internet.

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As a film teacher, Ryan doesn’t rely on the Internet all that much when he’s in the classroom, as they’re mostly watching films and analyzing them. However, he does use the Internet to help him design lesson plans and guide some of the course’s content. Also, his students use an online portal to conduct online discussions and submit assignments.

He knows he’d still be able to do his job if the Internet went down. “While being online definitely makes my job easier, it’s not necessary.”

Alex notes that while typing doesn’t require an Internet connection, writing offline is “dramatically less efficient” for him. Every time he’s forced to work offline, he’s “surprised at just how disabled my computer becomes.” He adds that “modern computing relies on an always-available Internet connection, and working without one is crippling.”

Fabio explains he can edit images offline, but it’s not long before he finds himself needing an Internet connection. “I just feel like something is missing if I don’t have an Internet connection, even if I’m not using it.”

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Kenneth answers “very little.” He believes 98% of the work he does requires an Internet connection. For him, “a day without Internet would be fruitless.” He jokes the only thing he can do when the Internet is down is play the T-Rex game in Chrome.

I agree with the majority here. 100% of my work is online. I’m a news writer, so I have to do research, and for the writing I do that isn’t news-related, I’m still doing some type of research. If I’m editing, I’m doing it online. And when I’m not working, I relax by… going online.

For those of us here whose main job is writing, much of our job is online. Even if we can type offline, like Alex said, it’s dramatically less efficient and crippling. But we want to hear from others who aren’t online writers and editors. How much of your work can you do offline? Let us know how much in the comments section below.

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