How to Hide Updates Using PowerShell in Windows 10

Unlike the previous versions of Windows, Microsoft made it a lot harder to manage the updates in all Windows 10 systems. In fact, there are no built-in options to easily hide the unwanted updates. That being said, I’ve already covered how you can manage and disable automatic updates in Windows 10. One way is to use the official troubleshooting app to temporarily hide the updates you don’t want to install.

Alternatively, you can also use Windows PowerShell to hide the unwanted Windows updates. Let me show you how.

Before you can use Windows PowerShell to hide the updates, you first need to install the Windows Update PowerShell Module. To do that, head over to the official site and download it.

powershell-download-pswindowsupdate

Once you’ve downloaded the module, open the downloaded zip file, and copy the “PSWindowsUpdate” folder to the following location:

powershell-install-pswindowsupdate

Once you’ve installed the PowerShell module, search for PowerShell in the Start menu, right-click on it and select the option “Run as Administrator.”

powershell-ps-run-as-administrator

By default, your user account will have restricted access, and you won’t be able to run any external scripts in PowerShell. To run external scripts, you need to set the execution policy to Unrestricted. To do that, enter the below command and press the Enter button.

powershell-set-execution-policy

As soon as you execute the command, you will be asked for the confirmation. Simply press the A key and then the Enter button on your keyboard. From this point onward, your user account will have unrestricted access.

powershell-confirm-execution-policy

If you want to, you can check the current execution policy of your user account using the below command. As you can see, I have unrestricted access.

powershell-get-execution-policy

After changing the execution policy, you are free to use the PowerShell however you want. To start, use the below command to get a list of all the available Windows updates.

powershell-get-update-list

Once you have the list of all the available updates, find the update you want to hide and note the title of the update. Enter the following command, and press the Enter button to hide the update. Don’t forget to replace Chicony* with the actual title.

We can use the wildcard (*) before and after the title as long as part of the title is correct and unique. If you don’t want to bother with the wildcards, just enter the full update title.

powershell-hide-update-using-title

Now PowerShell wants you to confirm your action. Simply press the A key on your keyboard and press the Enter button.

powershell-confirm-hide-update-using-title

This action will hide the target Windows Update. You can confirm that by looking at the letter H under “Status.” In case you are wondering, the letter H stands for Hidden.

powershell-update-hidden-using-title

Alternatively, you can also hide a Windows update using its KB Article ID. To hide a Windows update using its KB Article ID, simply use the command below. Don’t forget to replace the KB Article ID in the below command with the ID of the update you want to hide.

powershell-hide-update-using-kbid

Again, PowerShell will ask you for the confirmation. Enter the letter “A” and press the Enter button.

powershell-confirm-hide-update-using-kbid

You’ve successfully hidden the update.

powershell-update-hidden-using-kbid

In the future, if you ever want to unhide the update, get the list of all the available updates using Get-WUList and copy the KB Article ID of the update you want to unhide. Use the below command while replacing the KB Article ID with your own and press the Enter button.

powershell-unhide-update-command

The above action will again ask you for the confirmation; simply confirm the action, and you will have your update back.

powershell-update-unhidden

To wrap it up, change your execution policy back to Restricted using the below command. Having your user account run the scripts with unrestricted access is not good.

Do comment below sharing your thoughts and experiences about using PowerShell to hide updates in Windows 10.

5 comments

  1. Great tips and tweaks for Windows 8.1 and 10. Release have delayed installing 10 for a while just to let MS iron out any early bugs and for me to get my backups sorted. Keep up the good work.

  2. “PS C:\Users\Администратор> Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

    Изменение политики выполнения
    Политика выполнения защищает компьютер от ненадежных сценариев. Изменение политики выполнения может поставить под
    угрозу безопасность системы, как описано в разделе справки, вызываемом командой about_Execution_Policies. Вы хотите
    изменить политику выполнения?
    [Y] Да – Y [N] Нет – N [S] Приостановить – S [?] Справка (значением по умолчанию является “Y”): Y
    PS C:\Users\Администратор> Import-Module PSWindowsUpdate
    PS C:\Users\Администратор> Get-WUInstall -MicrosoftUpdate -ListOnly

    ComputerName Status KB Size Title
    ———— —— — —- —–
    WIN-SV4A0… —— KB3068708 383 KB Обновление для Windows 8.1 (KB3068708)

    PS C:\Users\Администратор> Hide-WUUpdate

    ComputerName Status KB Size Title
    ———— —— — —- —–
    WIN-SV4A0… —H– KB3044374 3 MB Обновление для Windows 8.1 (KB3044374)
    WIN-SV4A0… —H– KB3075249 99 KB Обновление для Windows 8.1 (KB3075249)
    WIN-SV4A0… —H– KB3080149 702 KB Обновление для Windows 8.1 (KB3080149)

    PS C:\Users\Администратор> Hide-WUUpdate -KBArticleID KB3068708
    PS C:\Users\Администратор> Get-WUInstall -MicrosoftUpdate -ListOnly

    ComputerName Status KB Size Title
    ———— —— — —- —–
    WIN-SV4A0… —— KB3068708 383 KB Обновление для Windows 8.1 (KB3068708)<<<<<<“

  3. I have accidentally hidden a chipset update that does not have a KB number. How do i make it visible now? I’m assuming that this is a very important update that i definitely need.

  4. A great help for me. I have had an issue with a security update for Internet explorer (Flash player) under Win 8.1 leading to let my printer control center crash. The previously mentioned official windows tool does not work under Win 8.1 (only Win 10). So I had to use the method mentioned here and I can confirm that this method works fine also under Win 8.1.

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