How to Get Things Done in Linux with Zanshin

How to Get Things Done in Linux with Zanshin

Many, many “productivityists” are followers of David Allen’s “Getting Things Done” methodology. The methodology itself doesn’t rely on a specific tool or application, but that hasn’t stopped fans from trying to develop the perfect one. Let’s take a look at one – Zanshin, which is part of the KDE Software Collection.

By Aaron Peters -
How To Stay On IRC Forever Using Linux

How To Stay On IRC Forever Using Linux

IRC is great, but it can be easily affected by your Internet connection. If you’re not afraid of the command line, you can keep your IRC connection going almost as long as you like.

By David Delony -
How to Add Your Own Web Apps to Bitnami LAMP Stacks

How to Add Your Own Web Apps to Bitnami LAMP Stacks

BitNami packages are a great way to test out a specific application. With a few extra steps, you can quickly deploy and try out all sorts of web-based applications. Here’s the full tutorial on adding web apps to your BitNami LAMP stack

By Aaron Peters -
Accessing The “Show Desktop” Icon In Ubuntu 12.10

Accessing The “Show Desktop” Icon In Ubuntu 12.10

Ubuntu 12.10 comes with a few ways for you to quickly access your desktop, but they are not very visible to the users. Here is a run down of the several ways you can use to access the Show Desktop icon in Ubuntu.

By Damien -
What’s New in Ubuntu 12.10

What’s New in Ubuntu 12.10

Now that Ubuntu 12.10 is finally here, let’s take a look at which features have made it to the final list and whether you should upgrade or not.

By David Delony -
Linux Application Review: KBackup

Linux Application Review: KBackup

If you are using KDE and are in need of a backup solution, KBackup is one simple application that can get the job done. Where Backintime provides a nice, OS X-esque interface, KBackup is back-to-basics program that will equally well. Check out the full review here.

By Aaron Peters -
How to Back Up Your Linux Machine to Box

How to Back Up Your Linux Machine to Box

It’s a good practice to keep a version of your back-ups on and off your computer. Here, we’ll show you how to back up your Linux machine to Box

By Aaron Peters -
Tiny Core Linux: A Barebone Linux Distro That Boots Very Fast

Tiny Core Linux: A Barebone Linux Distro That Boots Very Fast

Linux is good for almost everything. If you are running a small project that doesn’t require a full Linux distro, Tiny Core Linux is one small barebone Linux distro that boots very fast and comes with options for you to customize it to suit your needs.

By Damien -
How To Automate Mouse Clicks In Linux

How To Automate Mouse Clicks In Linux

Although the mouse transformed the computing world when it was inventented, it can actually become somewhat tedious, especially in repetitive operations. One piece of software, however, makes it possible to automate graphical programs by automating mouse clicks in Linux.

By David Delony -
How to Try Out Web Applications with Bitnami Stacks

How to Try Out Web Applications with Bitnami Stacks

Have you ever wanted to try a web app without dabbling into the installation and configuration? Luckily, Bitnami have stacks for different web apps so you can easily test them out effortlessly. Let check it out.

By Aaron Peters -
10 Things To Look For In Ubuntu 12.10

10 Things To Look For In Ubuntu 12.10

The upcoming Ubuntu 12.10 comes with plenty of new features. If you have missed our review of the beta, check out the top ten new arrivals in Ubuntu 12.10 that should catch your attention.

By Abhishek Prakash -
Ubuntu Studio: A Distro for Recording

Ubuntu Studio: A Distro for Recording

If you’re a musician or an audio engineer, and you don’t want to spend the kind of money on setting up a digital studio or don’t want to use a Mac for some reason, you should check out Ubuntu Studio.

By David Delony -
How to Install A Personal Google Drive Using FengOffice [Linux]

How to Install A Personal Google Drive Using FengOffice [Linux]

Google has a great set of services available for general consumers, and even offers it for a reasonable rate for businesses. But if you’re the paranoid type, or just like to do things yourself, there’s a way you can create something like Google Docs that you install and host on any Ubuntu box you might have. Here is how you can do it.

By Aaron Peters -
How to Set up Nomachine NX between Two Linux Systems

How to Set up Nomachine NX between Two Linux Systems

There are a number of ways you can log into one computer to run software from another: ssh for purely command-line work, VNC for a remote view of your desktop, RDP if you’re stuck (temporarily) in Windows. Nomachine is known for their NX system, which it compresses the data it sends and receives, making it suitable for slower network connections.

By Aaron Peters -
Choosing Linux-Compatible Hardware

Choosing Linux-Compatible Hardware

You hear about how fast and stable Linux is, so you download a distro and install it, only to find out that some piece of hardware, like your Wi-Fi, doesn’t work. Here are a few ways you can do to avoid hardware compatibility issue in Linux.

By David Delony -
The Differences Between an iPad and a Kindle Fire

The Differences Between an iPad and a Kindle Fire

The release of the new Amazon Kindle Fire makes the selection of a tablet a more difficult task. If you are sourcing for a tablet, this article shows the differences between the Kindle Fire and iPad and help you decide which tablet you should get.

By Laura Tucker -
3 Awesome Ubuntu Apps For Wallpaper Slideshow

3 Awesome Ubuntu Apps For Wallpaper Slideshow

Ubuntu comes with a set of pre-loaded wallpapers that can be used individually or as a slideshow that changes the background after a certain period of time, but it does not (easily) allows you to use your own set of wallpapers.
If you want to manage your wallpapers without any special effort, here are 3 easy-to-use wallpaper apps that will the change the way your desktop looks.

By Abhishek Prakash -
How to Increase Virtual Hard Disk Size in Virtualbox

How to Increase Virtual Hard Disk Size in Virtualbox

However, if you are using it as frequent as me, you will find that the 20GB of storage space get filled up very quickly. If you are looking to increase the virtual hard disk size, here is how you can do it.

By Damien -
History of Early Linux Distros

History of Early Linux Distros

If you haven’t noticed, if you’re looking for a Linux distribution, you’re spoiled for choice. Sites like DistroWatch lists hundreds of different Linux distros on the site. But where did they all come from?

By David Delony -
How to Integrate Google Services into Your Linux Desktop (Part 1)

How to Integrate Google Services into Your Linux Desktop (Part 1)

Google is a favorite among free software lovers because of their tendency to “don’t be evil.” This guide will show you how to hook up the programs on your Ubuntu desktop to the variety of Google web apps, for the nice, Linux-y experience we’re all looking for.

By Aaron Peters -
Understanding The Different Shell In Linux : Zsh Shell

Understanding The Different Shell In Linux : Zsh Shell

Zsh is a very powerful shell that is more popular than the commonly used Bash. It is highly interactive and flexible enough to customize it to your needs. It also comes with a powerful auto-completion functionality, along with recursive searches and a corrector included. For all that, some consider Zsh as an extended Bourne Shell.

By Adrien -
The History of Linux

The History of Linux

Linux has been around for more than 20 years and serves happily in both desktop and server roles. But it didn’t show up overnight. Linux is the result of the collaboration of lots of people over the years.

By David Delony -
Understanding The Different Shell In Linux : KornShell

Understanding The Different Shell In Linux : KornShell

By default, when we talk about a shell in Linux, most people think of Bash. It is true that it is the most wide spread and arguably one of the simplest shell to begin with, but there are also plenty of other shells out there yearning for your attention. Today, we shall go through another very famous shell: the Korn Shell (“ksh” for the intimates).

By Adrien -
Use Pandoc to Easily Convert Text File To PDF or eBook Format

Use Pandoc to Easily Convert Text File To PDF or eBook Format

We have shown you how to use Markdown to quickly produce clean HTML from text, but what if you also want to produce an ebook using the same content as you have on the web? There is another tool that allows you to take Markdown and turn it into OpenOffice/LibreOffice documents, PDF’s, or even e-books suitable for a Kindle or other e-reader.

By Aaron Peters -
How To Easily Edit Audio Tags On Linux

How To Easily Edit Audio Tags On Linux

How many times have you come across an audio file on your Music player with the name like “01.mp3” and there is no other details like the artist, album info, etc. Multiply that by the number of songs you have in your library and you know you are in for a headache. Today, I will show how you can easily manage your song’s name, structure and tags in the way you want it.

By Adrien -
How to Play Atari 2600 Games on Ubuntu

How to Play Atari 2600 Games on Ubuntu

If you happened to be an Atari brat while you were growing up, you can now relieve your 8-bit glory days on your Linux machine. Stella is an Atari 2600 emulator that works on Linux, Mac OS X, Windows and even more obscure systems like IRIX. It provides a very accurate emulation of the classic gaming system, and plays nearly every game ever released for it.

By David Delony -
Sage, A Great Mathematical Tool For Linux

Sage, A Great Mathematical Tool For Linux

GeoGebra may be a useful tool for solving maths equation, but when it comes to more powerful functions and complicated maths, you should give Sage a try. We’ve all heard of Matlab or Magma, but Sage offers an open source alternative to those two, and is, to my opinion, simpler to use.

By Adrien -
How to Boost Your Writing Efficiency With Markdown Content

How to Boost Your Writing Efficiency With Markdown Content

When it comes to writing, it is great to always create the draft in plain text. The problem lies when you need to transform those plain-text words into something nicely-formatted and readable. Fortunately, Linux provides two programs that allow you to draft in plain text, then convert to other, more graphical formats.

By Aaron Peters -
5 Lesser Known Ubuntu Based Distro You Have Not Heard Of

5 Lesser Known Ubuntu Based Distro You Have Not Heard Of

You might have heard of Edubuntu, Lubuntu etc but did you know that there are over 50 unofficial Ubuntu-based Linux distributions? In this post we will see some of these niche and unique Ubuntu variants.

By Abhishek Prakash -
How To Access Facebook From The Command Line [Linux]

How To Access Facebook From The Command Line [Linux]

If you are more of a Facebook person and you want to look cool with the console, you might wonder if there is any solution for you. The answer is yes! fbcmd is a little PHP software that allows you to access your Facebook account from the command line. Except for a few missing features, fbcmd is incredibly complete.

By Adrien -
An Introduction to Arch Linux

An Introduction to Arch Linux

The great thing about Linux distros is that there’s one for every skill level. If you’re comfortable with Linux and Unix and you like to customize things a little (or perhaps, a lot), you might want to give Arch Linux a try.

By David Delony -
Linux Humor : 5 Reasons Not To Take Linux Too Seriously

Linux Humor : 5 Reasons Not To Take Linux Too Seriously

No, no please don’t shoot! Of course, all Linux distro are great and should be taken seriously. But Linux is also different in many ways, especially when it comes to jokes and pranks. For this article, I will show you a short list of examples of this “Linux Humor.”

By Adrien -
How to Run WebOS Emulator In Linux

How to Run WebOS Emulator In Linux

The open-source WebOS project from HP may not be as popular as Android or iOS, but it is definitely still active and surviving. For those who are keen to test it without having a TouchPad, here is how you can run the WebOS emulator in Linux.

By Adrien -
How to Set A Live Wallpaper In Ubuntu With Slidewall

How to Set A Live Wallpaper In Ubuntu With Slidewall

While there are many wallpaper changing app for Linux, most of them are similar, do their job (changing the wallpaper) well and don’t seem interesting enough to warrant a review here. Slidewall is yet another wallpaper changer that comes with support for live wallpaper. It is pretty cool, I must say. Check it out.

By Damien -
How to Group Apps Together In Ubuntu Unity Launcher with Drawer

How to Group Apps Together In Ubuntu Unity Launcher with Drawer

Many Ubuntu users felt the need to group similar applications together in the Unity launcher to save some space. Ubuntu doesn’t comes with the ability for you to group apps together, but With Drawers, you can do so with ease.

By Abhishek Prakash -
MTE Explains : The Origin Of The Penguin Tux

MTE Explains : The Origin Of The Penguin Tux

Have you ever why the mascot for Linux is a penguin and why is it call “Tux”? We have the answer here, and surprisingly, there is a lot more about the penguin than you know.

By Adrien -
How To Emulate A TI Calculator On Linux

How To Emulate A TI Calculator On Linux

For a lot of geeks, the Texas Instrument Scientific Calculator was their best friends in high school. Thanks to emulation and Linux, it is now possible to use a TI again with nostalgia.

By Adrien -