4 of the Best Internet Speed Test Sites

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If you’ve swapped ISPs, or you suspect your current one isn’t giving you the speeds they promised, you can use an Internet speed test to see how fast everything is running. But which websites are the best, and why should you use them?

Here are the best Internet speed tests and how to use them.

1. Google

No – we don’t mean using Google to find speed tests! Google has its own speed test that you can find by searching for Internet speed test.

Speed Tests Google

When you do this, the first search result will consist of a button that says “Run Speed Test.” If you click this, Google will launch a speed test using automatic settings.

The speed test is very bare-bones: you can’t choose a server, and there are no statistics past the up and download speed. This makes it a pretty poor choice for accuracy, as there’s no real way to control it.

However, if you just want to perform a quick test for a rough idea of how fast your Internet speeds are, the Google speed check is the best choice. Just search the term and press the button, and you’ll have a speed result in seconds!

2. SpeedTest

One of the most popular speed test sites in the world, SpeedTest is an obvious recommendation.

Speed Tests Speedtest

If you’re not keen on messing around with details, you can click the “Go” button and the website will automatically pair you with the most recommended server. Alternatively, you can select a server near you for a more customizable experience.

While the automatic selection of servers is useful, some Reddit users reported that their SpeedTest results are higher than other test websites. This may suggest that ISPs boost their users’ connections to SpeedTest to give an inflated download speed.

3. SpeedOf

If you’re looking for something more thorough than the above two options, try SpeedOf. For one, its speed test is actually a few little tests bundled together.

Speed Tests Speedof

When you perform a speed test, the website will give you a sample file for your browser to download. You don’t see any pop-ups or need to actually save the file; your browser does all the work. If your Internet downloads the file faster than eight seconds, it repeats with a larger file. This continues until your browser takes longer than eight seconds.

When the upload test happens, the same thing happens but in reverse. When it takes longer than eight seconds for your computer to upload the sample file, the test ends.

This method is good because you’re downloading and uploading actual files, meaning the results will relate directly to your experience when you’re browsing the net.

The website even has a history tab where your past tests are stored. This makes SpeedOf a great pick for comparing speeds at different times, such as changing the router, computer/router placement, or ISP.

While these tests are very thorough, they’re only useful if there’s a server near you. SpeedOf doesn’t have great coverage worldwide, and there’s no way to choose your own server. As such, only use this website if the server it gives you is close enough for an accurate result.

4. TestMy

Fancy comparing your speeds against other people, whether that would be other users of your ISP, your country’s average, or even the world? Try TestMy, a download and upload speed checker that’s been around for about 20 years.

Speed Tests Testmy

The actual test process can be disorientating if you have a fast connection. Each stage of the test has its own webpage, so if your fast Internet blazes through the first steps, you’ll see a lot of pages appear and vanish again.

Once it’s done, it’ll show you a chart of your speed versus other people’s. This lets you see how your Internet is faring, especially against the speeds that other people using your ISP can manage.

Unfortunately, while you can select what server to test on, your range is very limited. For instance, Europeans can only pick between a server in London and one in Germany. As such, TestMy may not be ideal if the website doesn’t offer a server near you.

Checking If You’re Up to Speed

Regardless of whether you’re comparing ISPs, checking if the new router is faster than your old one, or are just curious to see how fast your Internet is, there are plenty of tools out there you can try. Now you know some very good tools, each of which fills their own niche.

Which is your favorite site? Did we miss a particularly good speed-testing site you want to share with us? Tell us below!

14 comments

  1. One would expect for all the testing sites to report pretty much the same results. In quick succession, I tested my download/upload speeds using 7 different sites. The numbers were pretty much all over the map:
    Download speeds range 31.8-43.8
    Uploads speeds range 9.6-36.7
    Ping speeds 6-220

    With such a spread in readings, it is very hard to trust any site.

  2. Google gave a much slower result than SpeedTest. Don’t know why.

  3. The first three sites gave me virtually the same results, but the fourth site’s results were considerably lower, although I still earned 4 and a half stars.

  4. A speed test I use regularly is fast.com and it seems pretty reliable and consistent. It’s parent is NetFlix and it’s easy to access. No it doesn’t give you layers of data nor is it configurable but it’s fast, easy and it seems consistent. My only question would be if some ISP’s throttle NetFlix traffic this could be affected but I haven’t researched it.

  5. the best is, with no doubt, NPERF !

  6. Fast.com is quite simple to check and very simple interface

    1. Yes, I also use fast.com for its ad-free and simple interface.

  7. BAR RECOMMENDATIONS!! Speed test website is litterally recommended by your ISP because its supported by them and advertises them on their website!! Of course it’s going to show you the best possibly results, it has high priority lane traffic provided to it, why isnt fast.com on this list? It let you know for the longest time if your ISP was throttling your connection to netflix, cause its owned by netflix, dont trust any if these recommendations these are all sponsored by companies giving prefered traffic, you will never get real responses off these.

  8. 65-9 Google, 178-12 ST, SP 98-12, 55-6 TF. It looks like you would need to test on all of them to look for the peaks & valleys. SpeedTest gave me about three times what Google/TF did! While TF had about half the Upload of the others. I’m supposed to “trust” this? Someone who has the interest should do a spreadsheet of these to see if they change by time of day/week. As long as I’m close to my “minimum” guaranteed speed from my ISP I’m fine. :-)

  9. Fast.com and Ookla are also good

  10. Why not try fast.com by Netflix.

  11. Speedtest sites are great, but they have their limits. Folks should know some of the other factors that can go into those speed test results, most notably, whether there is other traffic on your network taking place at the same time which could affect the results.

    Something else that not everyone realizes..is that the act of running a speed test (for the duration of the test) is likely going to cause issues for anyone else using the network at the same time. So if you run 20 speed tests in a row, and your spouse streaming TV in the next room is complaining of buffering..your speed tests were likely the culprit.

    If you’re running speed tests at work..please think twice. See this article about that: https://www.ifitstech.com/2019/09/29/please-stop-submitting-your-speed-test-results-to-it/

  12. Was hoping to see other speed tests comparable to dslreports, but it’s not even on the list…

  13. Speed tests are basically meaningless. They report the speed of your connection right at the moment of the test. It does not mean that you will ever get similar numbers ever again, whether they are fast, slow or mediocre.

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