Easily Back Up Your Partitions in Linux with Apart GTK

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Featured

If you have full partition backups, you can restore your data or even your operating system when disaster strikes. The main problem is creating the partition backup. Most tools for backing up disks and partitions on Linux feel complicated. Some expect you to use commands in the terminal. Others come with old-school interfaces or use cryptic lingo. Luckily, there is Apart GTK.

Apart GTK is a GUI for partclone that allows you to clone your partitions to compressed image backups. Then, you can quickly and easily recover them from those backups whenever you wish. Let’s see how you can keep your data safe with Apart GTK.

Installation

If you’re on Ubuntu or a compatible distribution, Apart GTK is available in the default repositories. You can search and install it from the Software Center or with the following command in a terminal:

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Installation

When the process completes, you’ll find Apart GTK among the rest of your apps.

Backup Your Partition

Find and open the Apart app from your Applications menu. It will prompt you to enter your administrative password. Apart GTK needs full access to your disks and partitions to be able to copy every bit of data on them.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Authentication

On the left of Apart GTK, you’ll see a list of all the partitions on your system. We had many storage devices on our testing PC, so the list is long. For your PC, you may only find one or two entries.

Click on the partition you want to backup. For us, it was “sda2.”

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Choose Partition

Note: Apart GTK can’t clone the system partition of the active OS. You have to boot up with a live CD to be able to back up the system partition.

At the top of Apart GTK’s window, you’ll see details about your chosen partition, as well as two options: Clone and Restore. Click on “Clone” to back it up. Then, enter a name in the Backup name field.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Backup Name

You can choose the compression method you prefer from the Compression drop-down menu. Zst should be pre-selected – it’s generally the best combination of compression and speed. Next, click the pull-down menu next to the Backup directory and select the folder where you want to store your backup.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Backup Directory

Click on “Create Image” on the bottom right and wait. The process needs some time, depending on the speed of your CPU and selected storage device’ as well as the total size of data to be backed up.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Backup Running

Currently, there is a bug with Apart GTK that prevents the process bar from being updated. Apart from an updating Elapsed time indication, the progress bar looked stuck (though it is running in the backend).

You can confirm that it is indeed running by checking the output file. If it is continuously increasing in size, then you know that it is running normally. Once the backup is completed, Apart GTK will update its window to inform you that the cloning process completed successfully.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Backup Completed

Restoring your Partition Backup

Once again, it is best not to restore a backup to the active partition. Other than that, restoring your backup with Apart GTK is easy.

In Apart GTK, choose the partition where you want to restore the backup from the list on the left. Click on the Restore button on the top right of Apart GTK’s window. Select the Image File that you want to restore from.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Restore Image

Click on “Restore Partition” on the bottom right of Apart GTK’s window. Apart GTK will inform you that restoring your image will overwrite all data on the chosen partition. Double-check that you’ve selected the correct one and click “Restore” to proceed with your backup’s recovery.

Backup Partitions In Ubuntu With Apart Gtk Overwrite Partition

When the process completes, you’ll find the contents of your backup in the selected partition. If it was a system partition, like in our case, by rebooting your PC to that OS, it will be back to the point when you initially made your backup.

Apart GTK is probably the friendliest tool for backing up a partition. It works for Windows partitions too, making it one of the best tools for dual-boot environments.

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Odysseas Kourafalos Odysseas Kourafalos

OK's real life started at around 10, when he got his first computer - a Commodore 128. Since then, he's been melting keycaps by typing 24/7, trying to spread The Word Of Tech to anyone interested enough to listen. Or, rather, read.

2 comments

  1. “If you’re on Ubuntu or a compatible distribution”
    What about if I am using any one of the hundreds or non-Ubuntu-based distros? After all, Ubuntu is not all there is to Linux.

  2. “What about if I am using any one of the hundreds or non-Ubuntu-based distros?”

    Go to the github page and build from source. There’s also a Docker version. Also instructions for Arch-based and Red Hat. But half the distros are based on Ubuntu (Lite, Mint, Zorin, Elementary, Pop! etc.).

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