Install Arch Linux from Scratch the Easy Way with Architect Linux

It’s no secret that Arch Linux can be tedious to install. In response to this an Arch fan has taken it upon himself to create Architect Linux. How does it stack up to the other Arch Linux installers out there? Let’s find out!

In short: Convenience. This live installer is directed at people who know how Arch works well enough to get everything going but don’t have the time to sit at a console entering commands to get everything perfect. That being said, Architect isn’t like Antergos Linux, a distribution where you click a few buttons (knowing what they do or not) and let it do its thing.


Architect Linux isn’t really a Linux distribution, per se. When it’s installed you don’t see its branding or anything like that. It’s more or less just a fancy front-end. When you boot it up, you’ll see an ncurses interface. Inside this interface is every single step towards getting a working Arch Linux installation on your PC.


The installer has a lot to offer. When you look down the list, just about every single thing required to get a standard Arch install up and going is in there. We’re talking partitioning (which can be done manually or automatically), base installation/configuration, user account creation, and root passwords, as well as desktop environment and graphic driver installation options and so much more. Suffice it to say, you’ll have a hard time figuring out what this installer can’t do.


If you’re a lazy Arch user who loves building from scratch but hates the effort of it all, Architect is probably one of the better choices out there. It does exactly what it says it will do, and it does it well. You can download Architect Linux for both 64bit and 32bit architectures.


If you’re interested in Arch Linux but don’t want to follow the official Arch Linux install guide for beginners, this Linux distribution is not for you. Though it seems simple enough on the surface, the reality is that the installer still relies on a user’s ability to understand things. If you want a quick and easy way to get Arch running, consider using a derivative. Derivatives are great for new users as they are often built with newbies in mind.


Take Manjaro Linux, for example. It takes the Arch Linux base and makes it into an Ubuntu-like stable distribution. It’s very easy to install (even easier than Architect Linux). Architect Linux, on the other hand, is clearly not designed for this purpose. After all, once you go through the setup process you still have to maintain a regular Arch Linux installation. If you don’t understand how to maintain a bleeding-edge Linux distribution, no amount of making the installation process easier is going to help in that.


  • Not automated, so users still get ultimate control over what is being installed
  • Easy to navigate user interface
  • Doesn’t fill the installation with unnecessary “branding” and logos
  • Takes away a lot of the tedium of installing graphics and wireless drivers manually
  • Boots fast
  • Lightweight and works well on older machines


  • Net-based only
  • Doesn’t have any option for installing AUR helpers

Architect Linux is a great tool, especially for those who love Arch Linux but grow tired of the sometimes-lengthy installation process. If you’ve been looking for a lightweight live installation tool for Arch, definitely check this one out.

How do you feel about easy installers for Arch Linux? Tell us below!

Leave a Reply

Yeah! You've decided to leave a comment. That's fantastic! Check out our comment policy here. Let's have a personal and meaningful conversation.