Free Windows ScreenSavers That Actually Do Something Productive

We’ve seen tons and tons of screen savers that just fill your screen with a bunch of random graphics. While that’s OK for some people, it might not be OK for you if you feel like seeing something interesting or at least making some productive use of the screensaver. I’ll show you a few Windows screen savers here that will have you clicking the “Preview” button just to keep seeing them.

Have you ever felt like you needed to leave a note to someone on your computer, but ran out of post-its? How about leaving a note on-screen in your screensaver? You can do this with WinLock, an imitation of Windows 8′s lock screen with a bit of a twist that lets you leave notes. WinLock also perfectly imitates the login process and aesthetics of the original Windows 8 lock screen. The developers don’t seem to be actively working on the project anymore, but it’s still a great piece of software for Windows 7.

You can download WinLock currently at this location.

To leave a note on WinLock, just click the “Leave A Note” button (the one on the right) below the clock. Your note, when submitted, will look something like this:

winscrsvr-winlock

In your settings, you’ll be able to change the background picture. The default background doesn’t help you much with note visibility. Also, be wary of advertising on the CNET downloader while downloading this application. It’s rather annoying. Don’t forget to opt out of installing the toolbars!

This is particularly useful for me, as I communicate frequently with people in other countries. If you’re an international person on the web (and there areĀ many of you out there), then you’ll likely find the World Clock screensaver quite the treat! It shows you an analog clock representing different areas of the world. In the center, you’ll see a large clock displaying your local time. This way, you’ll know when you have to get back on the computer for an international call. Here’s how the interface looks:

winscrsvr-worldclock

Included are good reference regions with sufficient distance from one another to let you know roughly how late it is in, say, Moscow. It’s situated somewhere above Dubai, so the hour should be roughly the same as their regional time. You can get your hands on the screensaver here. Ignore the warnings you get when downloading it with Google Chrome, as the browser may detect it as malicious. I tested it on my machine to make sure it’s safe.

Some people just have a craving to learn new things. When you’re bored, you can always use the Wikipedia screen saver. It’s not officially from Wikipedia, but it works just as it should. The screen saver shows you a random Wikipedia page every 60 seconds (by default). If you want to get it, feel free to check out this link.

Tell us about any cool (useful) screen savers you’ve found in a comment below. If you have trouble installing or running anything, please tell us so we can help you out!