How to Extract Audio From a Video File Using Pazera Audio Extractor

There are times when you want to extract only the audio of a video file. Maybe you have dozens of music videos stored in your computer’s hard drive and you want to convert all of them to mp3 files. Then you may want to copy these mp3 files to your iPod or MP3 player so that you can listen to the music on the move.

We have earlier discussed how to Rip audio from a YouTube video using uTubeRipper. But just in case you want to extract audio from a video file stored in your computer, this tutorial will be useful.

Although there are quite a good number of websites, tools and software available to convert a video file to audio, I found Pazera Free Audio extractor the simplest and most user friendly. I don’t recomend using web services to convert videos to audio because you have to first upload the video in their servers and then wait for some hours for the conversion to take place. When the conversion is over, you will again have to download the converted audio file. This is very time consuming and in some cases, the results are not very accurate.

Extract Audios From Videos

The best thing about this audio converter is that it’s a portable application. You don’t have to install anything and can use the application from a removable drive on any computer.

1. Extract the package and double click AudioExtractor.exe to start Pazera Audio extractor.

2. Click “Add files” on the left top of the application window to add video files to the main panel

Add Video Files For Audio Conversion

If you want to convert a lot of files in one go, hold down the control button and select the files one by one. These files will be added to the converter’s queue and will be processed one by one.

2.  Specify an Output Directory: Now specify an output directory where the audio files will be saved after the conversion. Select the radio button placed just underneath the Output directory section and browse to the location of the output folder.

Specify the Location of Converted Output Files

3. Selecting the audio profile: Now you have to select the audio profile for extraction. Pazera comes with a wide number of preconfigured audio profiles which is accessible from the profiles dropdown, as shown below:

Select Audio Profiles in Pazera Audio Convertor

You can choose to extract the original audio stream which comes with the video or choose the default encoder settings. There are also profiles which will allow you to extract the audio and then convert it to a specific bit rate e.g 64kbps, 128 kbps and so on. This will be useful if you want to perform multimedia editing on the generated audio file. If you want to just hear to the audio and do not care about the resampling, choose “MP3 stereo – Best quality”

4. Selecting the Output format: You can select the output format of the audio from the Output format section in Pazera Audio converter:

Select Output Formt for Audio Conversion

There are quite a few options available, you can choose between MP3, AAC, WMA, FLAC and OGG Formats. From this section you can adjust the volume of the audio as well – use the volume slider and drag it back and forth to increase or decrease the volume of the audio.

This feature is useful because some videos have very low volume and you can barely listen to the audio. You can boost the audio directly from the convertor and don;t have to use another application altogether.

5. Set the Desired Offset: This feature allows you to set an offset time for the audio. Let’s say you want to skip the boring 2 minute intro of a video and want only a portion of the audio to extract. You can achieve this by defining the start and end offset of the video file from “Advanced settings’ as shown below:

Set offsets for the Audio File

This is extremely useful when you want to trim the audio to particular sections and do not want to use another software to cut the audio file and stitch them together.

Once you are done tweaking all the settings, hit the “Convert” button and the application will start extracting the audio from all the video files and save them in the defined output folder of your choice.

Have you ever used an Audio extractor? Please share your ideas in the comments section.

Image credit: Tibby is finally back!

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