Deja Dup Makes Backup A Simple Task [Linux]

There are plenty of backup options in Linux. We have covered a few here, namely, back in time, AptOnCD, and Rsync. Deja Dup Backup is yet another backup tool, except that it turns the whole complicated backup process into kid stuff.

If you are using Ubuntu, you can install Deja Dup Backup via the Ubuntu Software Center, Synaptic Package Manger, using the command sudo apt-get install deja-dup or simply click here.

Deja Dup Backup Tool can be found at Applications -> System Tools. The main interface is a small window with only two big icons – Restore and Backup.

deja-dup-main

Clicking the Backup button will bring you through a short series of steps. At the first run, you will be asked where to backup your files/folders. Other than your local hard disk, you can select an external drive, connect to Amazon S3 or even backup to your own FTP server.

deja-dup-backup-folder

Next, it will prompt you to select the folder to backup. By default, the Home folder is automatically included in the backup list. You can remove it or add new folder to the list.

deja-dup-folder-to-backup

Deja dup comes with encryption support so you can backup and encrypt your files. If you have enabled encryption, it will prompt you for a password. Once the password is provided, it will proceed to backup the files/folders.

deja-dup-encryption-password

This is what you will see after the backup.

deja-dup-encrypted-files
Restoring files

The Restoration process is even easier. Just click the Restore button and it will check your backup folder for previous backup.

deja-dup-restore

Next, it will ask if you want to restore to the original location or another folder. Once you picked your choice, the restoration will start.

deja-dup-restore-to-folder

What is missing from Deja Dup?

Deja Dup also comes with a schedule backup feature where you can schedule the backup to run at regular interval. However, it doesn’t come with the incremental backup. Everytime you perform a backup, it will encrypt the whole folder and dump to the backup location. it would be good if it can detect what have changed since the last backup and backup only the changed files. Update: Deja Dup does come with incremental backup feature.

If you are not particularly concern about the incremental backup feature, Deja Dup Backup Tool can be a really simple backup tool. it may not have complicated features, but it works reasonably well, and best of all, it is really easy to use. What do you think? Is such a simple backup tool sufficient for you?