About Aaron Peters

Aaron is an interactive business analyst, information architect, and project manager who has been using Linux since the days of Caldera. A KDE and Android fanboy, he'll sit down and install anything at any time, just to see if he can make it work. He has a special interest in integration of Linux desktops with other systems, such as Android, small business applications and webapps, and even paper.

Articles by Aaron Peters

How to Set up Nomachine NX between Two Linux Systems

How to Set up Nomachine NX between Two Linux Systems

There are a number of ways you can log into one computer to run software from another: ssh for purely command-line work, VNC for a remote view of your desktop, RDP if you’re stuck (temporarily) in Windows. Nomachine is known for their NX system, which it compresses the data it sends and receives, making it suitable for slower network connections.

Two Ways to Access Your Android Device with Linux File Managers

Two Ways to Access Your Android Device with Linux File Managers

Since the release of Android’s Gingerbread version, Google made what was probably a market-and technology-driven decision to use the Media Transfer Protocol (MTP) when an Android device is connected to a desktop. While MTP is supposed to be a better solution, it doesn’t work out of the box on Linux. However, with a couple of quick changes, you can make it happen.

Use Pandoc to Easily Convert Text File To PDF or eBook Format

Use Pandoc to Easily Convert Text File To PDF or eBook Format

We have shown you how to use Markdown to quickly produce clean HTML from text, but what if you also want to produce an ebook using the same content as you have on the web? There is another tool that allows you to take Markdown and turn it into OpenOffice/LibreOffice documents, PDF’s, or even e-books suitable for a Kindle or other e-reader.

How to Boost Your Writing Efficiency With Markdown Content

How to Boost Your Writing Efficiency With Markdown Content

When it comes to writing, it is great to always create the draft in plain text. The problem lies when you need to transform those plain-text words into something nicely-formatted and readable. Fortunately, Linux provides two programs that allow you to draft in plain text, then convert to other, more graphical formats.