Ask MTE: Delete Other Administrators, Delay Startup Applications, Backing Up Windows 7 And Many More… (Windows, Week 18)

ask-windows-expert-logoHello everyone and welcome back to “Ask a Windows Expert”, where you ask the questions and we get a Windows expert to investigate your inquiry and give you the best answer possible. We’re proud to announce that we’re on our 18th week running and have had our inbox full since we’ve started this series. Let’s have a look at some of your questions that have appeared on our inbox this week! To submit your own question, click “Ask Our Experts Now!” on the right side of this page.

A: Without any third-party applications, you won’t be able to do something like this with startup programs, unfortunately. I have the opinion that using such applications is messy and the fewer you use, the better off you are. However, if you really want to have a startup delay (which isn’t such a bad idea) you can download Startup Delayer. Just click on this link to get to it. Startup Delayer by r2 Studios will allow you to pick which applications you’d like to delay. I hope this is what you’re looking for.

A: In your question, you already mentioned that you disabled anti-virus applications. Did you also disable your firewall?

If you did disable both, then you have to look at error logs to see what happened. Look for “C:\Windows\Logs\WindowsBackup\BackupFiles_error.log“. Before “_error.log,” there will be an identifier. Just open up a log that’s in that folder. If you don’t find the log or don’t find anything helpful within the log, look at the last entry in “C:\Windows\Logs\CBS\CBS.log.” You might have to copy it onto your desktop to properly read the log.

If you still can’t find anything helpful, use msconfig to disable startup programs that might interfere with the backup process. Read this article if you don’t know how to use msconfig.

If you continue having problems, please come back in the comments section so we can discuss your issue.

A: To do this, you will have to use the ever-famous “net” command on your Windows command line. The command lets you make changes to your system in many ways, including your user accounts. If you would like to delete an administrator, you must access your command line and type

net user <username> /delete

Replace “<username>” with the name of the administrator account you’d like to delete.

You’ve also mentioned demoting administrative accounts to standard. This, to my knowledge, isn’t possible.

A: First, make sure that you installed a compatible driver for any Bluetooth device you use. All drivers must express compatibility to Windows 7. If you’re not even running a Bluetooth device, there’s a service trying to access it. This would take a little more investigation. Check “services.msc,” which you can find by typing it at the bottom of your Start menu.

If you continue having problems, try disconnecting the Bluetooth device from the computer and restart the PC without it. For any other inquiries, please go to the comments section so we can discuss.

A: Sometimes, you just can’t stop it. You usually won’t have problems as long as your computer is not infected. There’s a chance, however small, of a piece of malware affecting your computer and preventing some programs from working properly. A good virus scan is recommended when you get these errors out of the blue (i.e. you didn’t install any program right before the error started popping up). Other than that, you’re fine.

A: This might happen because you or someone else might have inadvertently zoomed out of the page. You can zoom out using the “Ctrl” and minus key or holding “Ctrl” while scrolling down on the mouse scroll wheel.

To correct this, press “Ctrl+0″ on your keyboard. If that didn’t correct it, this means that the page is being rendered at that zoom level. You can just zoom in using “Ctrl +” on your keyboard. Repeat the process as many times as you need to in order to read messages clearly again. This is a browser issue but could also be a problem with the site, as some webmasters might forget to properly set font sizes when they design a page during a remake.

A: While this isn’t totally a Windows-related question, I can understand where you’re coming from. An operating system is the software on your computer that communicates with the hardware. When you turn on your computer, you’ll see a splash screen from Windows saying “Starting Windows” or something to that nature. Older versions of Windows might just show a simple animation while loading. This lets you know that your operating system is starting.

An operating system is the glue that holds everything together. It’s what you run programs on. You don’t literally run them on your computer because the operating system has an abstraction layer that takes care of hardware communications in every program. This is why, when you run a program, you’re really running it on the operating system, not directly on the computer, if you can understand what I mean.

Examples of operating systems are Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Mac OSX, Ubuntu Linux, CentOS, and Unix.

Want to find out what operating system you use? That’s simple! Just hold the “Win” key, located next to either “Alt” key, and press “Pause/Break” on your keyboard. A screen will pop up telling you your operating system version. If you are still curious about other things regarding this question, please feel free to use the comments section to start a discussion.

We’d like to know if you have any questions about the material written here. Please feel free to ask anything on the comments section regarding what has been discussed here. If you have any inquiries of your own, you know where to submit them!