Ask a Windows Expert – Week 6

There were many intriguing questions in our inbox lately, some of them more difficult than others, but we assure you we can tackle ‘em all! If you got any inquiries about issues you’re having with Windows, email us at windows-help [at] maketecheasier.com or click on the “Ask Our Experts Now!” button. This button is right next to the banner advertisement on the top of every page on this website. Everyone’s got an issue with Windows, so let’s hear them, and we’ll get a Windows expert on the case right away!

A: Assuming this isn’t a fluke, Windows is programmed to show an AutoPlay dialog for devices in which new media has been detected. That means that you’re probably trying to plug in your iPhone to your computer without anything new in it. You can configure Windows to show an AutoPlay dialog window every time you connect it. First of all, connect your iPhone to your computer, access your control panel, click “Hardware and Sound.”

OK. Once you’ve done that, click “AutoPlay”. You’ll get this window:

winhelp-autoplay

Just select your iPhone from the list and pick “Ask me every time.” This will most likely solve your problem. Surely enough, every situation is different and we might encounter some issues even with this method. Don’t forget reconnecting the phone to the computer after saving settings.

In some cases, you can also solve the problem by going to “Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Devices and Printers”. After that, right-click your iPhone and click “Troubleshoot”. The application will automatically update drivers for you. Try the AutoPlay configuration option first, though. If that doesn’t work, you can take out this big gun. If everything fails, just comment below and we’ll work together at a solution.

A: For others referencing this, the following are more details related to the error code:

  • BCP1: 0000000000000020
  • BCP2: FFFFFA80043B6000
  • BCP3: FFFFFA80043B6410
  • BCP4: 0000000004410000

According to the Windows Bug Check Code Reference, you’re having a bad pool header code. First of all, it means that the other “BCP” codes weren’t necessary, but it’s still kind of essential to know what kind of data ran the crash. As far as I can tell, it’s not software-related. Your problem is hardware-related, unfortunately. Most likely, the physical memory on your computer has corrupted and the bell has tolled on one of the cards. If the error occurs randomly, then it just strengthens this argument. To make sure that your memory has become faulty, run memtest on your computer via bootable disk. Any error means that you must replace a card of your memory. Try switching cards, using one at a time on your computer, if you have more than one. If you don’t know how to do this, I suggest you let a professional handle it. A memtest error will look something like this:

winhelp-memtest-error

Any single error in your memory could cause catastrophic failure in your computer. More errors would make RAM the most likely cause of problems in your computer.

A: Judging by the nature of your problem, I think that you have either a video driver problem or a Flash issue. You must uninstall Flash and install it again. You can do it like this: Close your browser, go to “Control Panel -> Programs -> Programs and Features”, and uninstall Adobe Flash Player. If you have more than one version, remove all of them. Start your browser again, and go to this link. That will take you to the Flash Player page. Now, just download and install it. If problems persist, continue:

Go to “Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Device Manager”. Now, just find your display adapter, right-click it, and click “Properties”. In the “Driver” tab, click “Roll back driver”. If that button doesn’t exist, you must install the manufacturer’s original drivers on your machine again. I suggest downloading and installing their latest drivers.

Both of these solutions are most likely to help you resolve your issue. If you continue to have problems, just hit us up on the comments section and someone will get to you within 24 hours.

A: That kind of code could be due to bad communication between the motherboard’s memory controller and a memory card’s contacts. Here’s one thing: If you don’t know how to work with an open computer, get an expert to open it up for you and perform the steps that will be described here.

All you need to do is take out your RAM card, put 90+ percent isopropyl alcohol on a soft cloth, rub the card with it, and blow it out with compressed air. You should use canisters rather than your mouth or an electric air compressor. The latter sources can introduce unwanted humidity to the RAM card. While you’re at it, clean out the motherboard’s memory channel contacts with some alcohol also. Make sure that you’re always using something with more than 90 percent purity.

If the whole process doesn’t work, download memtest (mentioned in the other BSOD question above) and see if your RAM has errors. If you’ve got some red lines, consider replacing the RAM. This must be the cause of your error.

We’ll keep our eyes and ears open for messages through our inbox. Remember, if you’re having a problem with Windows, or you have questions in general about the operating system, we’re here to help! Just drop us a line and email us at windows-help [at] maketecheasier.com. Alternatively, you can click the following button below:

Ask a Windows Expert!

Don’t forget to mention your operating system version. If you are using a beta product, mention the build, so we can pick apart the OS for the problem, if possible. Use as much detail as you can! Leave a comment below if you’d like to talk about any of the questions.