10 Useful Ubuntu-related Sites You Should Bookmark

We have arrived at the last part of the Ubuntu Jaunty series. If you have missed the first four part, here are the links:

First partWhat’s new in Ubuntu 9.04
Second partHow to upgrade from ext3 to ext4 without formatting the hard disk
Third part9 things you need to install after installing Ubuntu Jaunty
Fourth partDownload Ubuntu Installation guide and cheatsheet

In the fifth and the last part of the series, we are going to recommend to you some of the useful Ubuntu-related websites that you should bookmark and reference to regularly.

1) Ubuntuforums

Needless to say, the best place to go for Ubuntu support is none other than the popular Ubuntu Forums. This is the only place where you can find all kind of advices, tips and tricks, hacks and solutions related to Ubuntu. If there is a Ubuntu-related problem that you can’t solve, most likely it has already been discussed in the forums.  Simply do a search in the forums or post your question and you will receive plenty of help from the community.

2) Ubuntu Guide

As its name implies, UbuntuGuide is a wiki where you can find plenty of guide, tips and tricks for Ubuntu. It covers information from Ubuntu Dapper to Jaunty and is available in multiple languages. While UbuntuForums is a great means to get solutions for your problems, UbuntuGuide is the place to go to find new tricks and apply them in your system.

3) Ubuntu Hardware Support List

While Ubuntu supports a wide range of devices, there are still times when you can’t get a particular hardware to work. The Hardware Support page shows a hardware compatibility list that you can refer to before you make any hardware purchase. This hardware support page is maintained by the community and anyone can add/modify the entry.

4) Ubuntu Documentation

It is no doubt that Ubuntu is an easy to use and user-friendly distro. However, if you are still having difficulties navigating around and get it to perform simple daily tasks, you can head on to Ubuntu Documentation and read about everything you need to know about Ubuntu. It won’t make you an expert, but at least it can help you to get started (and perhaps show your friends how geeky you are).

5) Launchpad

Launchpad is the place for you to discover new open-source applications or retrieve source code/installation instruction for third party apps that are not found in the Ubuntu repositories.

6) Gnome-look.org

If you love eye-candy, beautiful wallpapers, login screen, splash screen and everything about your Ubuntu system, then gnome-look.org is the place to visit. It contains a great collection of artworks and themes contributed by the community. They are free to download and use.

Kubuntu and Xubuntu users can check out kde-look.org and xfce-look.org respectively.

7) Ubuntu Brainstorm

Ubuntu Brainstorm is a Digg-like site where you can submit your ideas/suggestions/stuffs to be included in future version of Ubuntu and let others vote for it. Popular ideas (those that received a lot of votes) are reviewed by the Ubuntu team and possibly include them in the future release.

8) Full Circle Magazine

Full Circle Magazine is the only website that is dedicated to publish a free Ubuntu magazine (in pdf format) every month. Being a loyal subscriber, I have found their magazines very informative, yet doesn’t get too technical in detail. It is great for new users who wanted to learn more about Ubuntu.

9) Ubuntu Seach Engine

A Google custom search engine dedicated to search only Ubuntu-related stuffs. Currently it indexes 169 Ubuntu-related sites, including UbuntuForums, Ubuntu Wiki and Ubuntu Guide.

Other dedicated Ubuntu search engine that you can go to include Ubuntu-Search and Ubuntu Wire.

10) Planet Ubuntu

Planet Ubuntu is a blog written and updated regularly by Ubuntu developers and contributors. This is where you can get the latest and updated news about your system.

What other sites do you visit for your Ubuntu needs?

Image credit: Kartihksn